Dancehouse

AN ARTIST IN YOUR BACKYARD

AN ARTIST IN YOUR BACKYARD is a community access project specifically designed to engage creatively with residents of Carlton Housing Estate. It proposes art as part of every day experience and uses dance as a catalyst for community access and cultural interaction. The project invites three lead dance artists; Becky Hilton, James Bachelor and Sarah Aiken, to be artists in residence for 10 weeks in the outdoor areas of the housing estate. Together with their collaborators, the artists will rehearse, share their practices and re(create) material, offering residents access to dance via (in)direct involvement in the dance making process.

SHARING DAY
Date:
Sunday, 17 December
Time: 11am - 3pm
Where:
 The Community Grocer market place, Carlton Housing Estate
This event is wheelchair accessible

 

BECKY HILTON - COMMON GROUND (The Table)

Collaborators: Amaara Raheem, Ingrid Voorendt, Leisa Shelton

COMMON GROUND (The Table) is a weekly encounter between a shifting constellation of dance artists, locals and volunteer workers at the Carlton Housing Estate. At an empty table situated in the context of the Friday morning community market, a constantly transforming group of people meet and exchange stories, experiences, dances, food, world views; mapping out a suite of choreographies that wend from Ethiopia, from Footscray, from the Philippines, from just the other side of Princes St, to the shared time and place, to the common ground, to The Table every Friday morning from September to December.

 Inspired by Sara Ahmed's meditation on solidarity:

 'Solidarity does not assume that our struggles are the same struggles, or that our pain is the same pain, or that our hope is for the same future. Solidarity involves commitment, and work, as well as the recognition that even if we do not have the same feelings, or the same lives, or the same bodies, we do live on common ground.'

COMMON GROUND (The Table) situates dance artists and their practices in the context of the Friday morning Community Market at the Carlton Flats, and experimental dance becomes, for a time, one part of the complex system of actions and interactions happening  at the Carlton Housing Estate.

 

SARAH AIKEN - SET & TOOLS FOR PERSONAL EXPANSION

Collaborators: Claire Leske, Daniel Arnott, Emily Robinson

Sarah Aiken's work absorbs and extends space and transgresses the limits of her body to consider the possibilities of space, reworking the self through social and physical means. In this work, Sarah examines the ways in which our physicality conditions the manners in which we project ourselves, and act upon the world. Whether large or small, the body's relationship to space is both personal and political. Sarah uses people, devices, technology and matter, as well as movement, to extend her reach to contract, expand and multiply personal power. Moving from the mundane to the spectacular, from the sublime to the ridiculous, Sarah distorts and manipulates bodies and objects to playfully re-imagine perspective, scale and perception.

 

JAMES BATCHELOR - METASYSTEMS

Collaborators: Anthony Hamilton, Jessie Oshodi, Leisa Shelton

METASYSTEMS is a series of short works by James Batchelor for theatres and public spaces. Inspired by and translating the processes taking place at the construction site, METASYSTEMS is an observation of the changing urban landscape. It analyses the human encounter with the material world, the desire to shape it and the physical positioning of body and object. The work invites us to consider our local environment and its inherent motions and rhythms. One of James' ongoing goals with Metasystems is to connect communities with the architecture of their past, present and future city. It is an interface between body and building within the endless cycles of construction and demolition. With each new iteration of Metasystems, the work adapts to local context; considering the specific function and flow of the site. The local people form part of this context and shape the ongoing evolution of Metasystems. In this sense, it is a process rather than a product.

 

Image: James Batchelor, METASYSTEMS